What a Child Says

A message every adult should read, because children are watching you and doing as you do, not as you say.  

When you thought I wasn’t looking,

I saw you hang my first painting on the refrigerator, and I immediately wanted to paint another one.

I saw you feed a stray cat, and I learned that it was good to be kind to animals.

I saw you make my favorite cake for me and I learned that the little things can be the special things in life.

I heard you say a prayer, and I knew there is a God I could always talk to and I learned to trust in God.

I saw you make a meal and take it to a friend who was sick, and I learned that we all have to help take care of each other.

I saw you give of your time and money to help people who had nothing and I learned that those who have something should give to those who don’t.

I saw you take care of our house and everyone in it and I learned we have to take care of what we are given.

I saw how you handled your responsibilities, even when you didn’t feel good and I learned that I would have to be responsible when I grow up.

I saw tears come from your eyes and I learned that sometimes things hurt, but it’s all right to cry.

I saw that you cared and I wanted to be everything that I could be.

I learned most of life’s lessons that I need to know to be a good and productive person when I grow up.

I looked at you and wanted to say, “Thanks for all the things I saw when you thought I wasn’t looking.”

It is written by a former child.”

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Discuss ?

Great minds discuss ideas
Average minds discuss events
Small minds discuss people

Still most people discuss people most of the time.
Does that mean that most people have small minds?

Congressman Takes Oath on Qur’aan

A jubilant Keith Ellison, the first Muslim elected to Congress, was sworn in to office Thursday holding his left hand on a leather-bound volume of a Quran that Thomas Jefferson once owned.

(An English translation of the Arabic, it was published in 1764 in London, a later printing of one originally published in 1734. It was acquired in 1815 as part of a 6,400-volume collection that Jefferson sold for $24,000, to replace the congressional library that had been burned by British troops the year before, in the War of 1812.)

In a day of firsts, the 43-year-old lawyer and former Minnesota state representative was sworn in by Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, the first female speaker of the House of Representatives.

“It’s a day of welcoming,” said Ellison, accompanied by his wife, Kim, and their four children, including 12-year-old Elijah, wearing an African kente cloth draped over his suit. “It’s a day of more people coming into the process.”

“You sure know how to attract a crowd,” Pelosi said to Ellison as they prepared for his ceremonial swearing-in in a wood-paneled chamber of the Capitol before hundreds of journalists from around the world, including the Qatar-based TV channel Al-Jazeera.
Replied Ellison: “Maybe they’re here for you.”

Ellison then held his right hand in the air and placed his left hand on two brown leather-bound volumes of the Quran, which were held aloft by his wife, a teacher at an alternative school in St. Paul, Minn.

Moments earlier, the 110th Congress had been sworn in en masse on the House floor, where Ellison shook hands with Rep. Virgil Goode, R-Va., who had criticized Ellison for planning to use the Quran.

Ellison said he followed through with his plan to suggest coffee with Goode, whose district includes Jefferson’s historic home of Monticello. He said Goode had accepted.
“I don’t anticipate we’re going to have any problems,” Ellison said. “We’re not holding any grudges.”

Ellison, characterizing his faith as mainstream American, tried to minimize the media hype over Goode and the Quran.

He challenged an Arab journalists’ contention that Americans dislike Muslims and struck a matter-of-fact tone in describing his feelings about making history by swearing on the Quran.
“I haven’t really thought about the historical significance of it,” he said. “I’m a Muslim. It’s my faith.”

Ellison’s ceremonial swearing-in took place in silence, apart from the sounds of hundreds of camera clicks. The two Qurans, published in London in 1764, then were placed in a white cardboard box and returned to Librarian of Congress James Billington, who walked them through a maze of underground tunnels to the Library of Congress across the street.
“They have to be handled lightly,” Billington said. “I’m liable for them.”
Ellison, introducing his family to the media, gave a thumbs-up sign and said, “We’re here to work for the American people.”

Note: Information in italics within brackets is from other sources