Never – – –

Never reply when you are angry

Never make a promise when you are happy

Never make a decision when you are sad

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The Bosses

The bosses I had faced during my service with three different from December, 1962 to September, 1999 interestingly have be identified in a research.

Bosses who crave power but fear they might lose it can undermine their teams’ productivity.
Based on the research of Jon Maner and Charleen R. Case

The dreaded Bad Boss comes in many varieties. There are the incompetent ones, the lazy or defensive ones, the ones who claim your work as their own, or those who prefer to rule through intimidation.
Jon Maner, a professor of management and organizations at Kellogg School of Management, has studied a specific breed of bad boss—those who intentionally sabotage their teams’ cohesion in order to protect their own status as leader.

Maner’s research shows that leaders will intentionally sideline high-performing team members, limit communication and social bonding among team members, or compile ill-matched teams if they think it will help ensure their own place at the top
The danger of this type of bad boss is significant.
“It can cause the group to fall apart at a basic level,” Maner says. “If you have people who don’t like each other and aren’t allowed to communicate effectively with one another, then really, you don’t have a group at all anymore.”

Maner and collaborator Charleen Case, a doctoral student at the Kellogg School, found that leaders who were driven by a desire for power (or dominance motivated) were more likely to undermine a group’s communication and cohesion than those who were motivated by a desire for respect (or prestige motivated). Those power-hungry leaders were most inclined to behave this way when they were told that the power hierarchy in the group was unstable and they may lose their position at the top. And they were most likely to undermine group cohesion by isolating the one highly skilled member of the group

The irony, of course, is that this behavior is being perpetrated by the person who should be most invested in and most skilled at getting his or her team to work together in order to be productive.

From My diary of July, 1955

We are not here to play, to draw to drift
We have hard work to do and loads to lift
Shun not the struggle, face it, its God’s gift.

Say not the days are evil— who’s to blame?
And fold the hands and acquiesce— O shame!
Stand up, speak out, and bravely, in God’s Name.

It matters not how deep entrenched the wrong,
How hard the battle goes, the day, how long;
Faint not, fight on! Tomorrow comes the song.

(Maltbie D. Babcock in “Thoughts for Everyday Living”, 1901 A.D.)

Behaviour

A man married a beautiful girl. He loved her very much. One day she developed a skin disease. Slowly she started to lose her beauty. It so happened that one day her husband left for a tour. While returning he met with an accident and lost his eyesight. However, their married life continued as usual. But as days passed she lost her beauty gradually. Blind husband did not know this and there was not any difference in their married life. He continued to love her and she also loved him very much.

One day she died. Her death brought great sorrow to her husband.
He finished all her last rites and announced that he wanted to leave that town.
A man from behind called and said, “Now, how will you be able to walk all alone? All these days your wife used to help you.”
He replied, “I am not blind. I was acting because if she knew l could see her ugliness, it would have pained her more than her disease. So I pretended to be blind. She was a very good wife. I only wanted to keep her happy.”

Sometimes it is good for us to act blind and ignore one another’s short comings, in order to be happy.