Army major who ‘tied’ Kashmiri man to jeep honoured

The incident had deepened the army-civilian divide and sparked violent protests in the militancy-hit valley. Reports Rahul Singh of Hindustan Times, New Delhi (India). May 22, 2017 Indian Standard Time

An army major, who was in the eye of a storm for allegedly tying a Kashmiri man to a jeep to use him as a human shield, has been awarded the army chief’s commendation card. Confirming the development, army spokesperson Colonel Aman Anand said the officer had been awarded the Chief of Army Staff’s Commendation (COAS) card for “sustained efforts in CI (counter insurgency) operations”.

The army found itself in the middle of a firestorm after the surfacing of a video clip that showed a man tied to the fender of a Rakshak jeep and paraded through villages. A day after the video clip surfaced on April 14, 2017 the army ordered a probe into the incident.

In the video, announcements of people being warned that “this will be the fate of stone-pelters” could be heard in the background. The incident had triggered outrage in Kashmir, with separatists saying it was on “expected lines from an oppressor”.

The incident had deepened the army-civilian divide and sparked violent protests in the militancy-hit valley.

Finding the Best Leaders (The Bosses – 5th installment)

Click here to read 1st Installment
Click here to read 2nd Installment
Click here to read 3rd Installment
Click here to read 4th Installment

There is also the question of finding leaders who are more interested in receiving prestige and respect than having power. This is a particular challenge since many people who desire power tend to self-select into positions of leadership, while prestige-motivated workers may be happier working in less flashy positions.

“A real trick for organizations is to identify who those people are and raise them up into positions of leadership, whether or not they ask for it, because they might not always be as inclined as power-hungry people are to seek high-status positions in their organization,” Maner says.

But Maner cautions against seeing these prestige-motivated leaders as a cure-all. “Our work has painted a pretty magnanimous portrait of prestige-oriented leaders,” Maner says, “but I think that’s probably an oversimplification.”
In future research, he hopes to explore how prestige-motivated leaders make decisions when forced to choose between what will make the group happy and what is best for the organization.

“We have some preliminary evidence that they will undermine the goals of the group if it means maintaining prestige within the eyes of their subordinates,” he says.

In the end, the goal of his research is to help organizations function smoothly and productively.
“The ultimate goal here is to figure out how to help groups perform better,” he says. “That means selecting better leaders and bringing out the best in leaders. By understanding the motives that might drive leaders to behave in ways that hurt their organization, we’re better armed to combat those behaviors.

An Engineer’s Revenge

An engineer was removing the engine parts from a car when he saw a famous heart surgeon in his shop.
Engineer went to the heart surgeon and said, “Look at this engine, I opened its heart, took the valves out, repaired and put them back”.
So why do I get such a small salary and you get huge sums ?”
The doctor smiled at the engineer and came close to engineer’s ear and said, “Try the same when the engine is running.”

The engineer smiled back, came close to doctors ear and said, “I can pick any dead engine and make it alive, can you ??? And Doctor do not forget that all your instruments and machines have been designed and got manufactured by enginers.”