Woman of Pakistan in Guinness Book

The slogan of so-called Free world about veiled Muslim women of Pakistan has been bellied. They are working in all fields of life shoulder to shoulder with men in medical, engineering, administration, judiciary, army, air force, teaching, and what not. Some have left the US and Europe people wondering by fly commercial and fighter planes while they wear Hijab (they are veiled Muslim women).

Some female pilots are flying in PIA (Pakistan International Airlines), even as Captain. One can also see few females taking training in flying schools. But a female pilot’s biggest achievement, in my opinion, is flying fighter jets in Pakistan Air Force, just as their male counter parts do.

Being female pilots, they have been able to qualify and fulfill the most stringent requirements of a fighter pilot, that is, high ‘g’ maneuvers and other physically and emotionally stressful exercises like interceptions and dog fights etc.

Female fighter pilots have been able to break not only the sound barrier but the psychological barrier (in Pakistan) as well that flying fighter aircraft is the exclusive preserve of men.

On the top is Captain Pilot Shahnaz Laghari who is the World’s first Hijab wearing pilot. She can fly an aeroplane all by herself. Not only has this but she do it while fully covered in veil.

She is the only one in the World who has her name in The Guinness Book of World Record as the First Veiled Pilot. This shows that if one is determined, anything can be achieved and that also by staying within the boundaries of the religion.

This is not all but she is striving for the rights of women in Pakistan. She is serving the women of Pakistan by opening free education centers and sewing centers for poor women in Pakistan.

She participated in General Elections 2013 in Pakistan as an independent candidate from Lahore NA–122. The electoral symbol allotted to her was a cow.

This really is an enormous achievement for a lady as Pakistani culture is considered to be male dominant and it is said that women are highly discouraged to engage in many activities.

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Kashmir ‘mass rape’ survivors fight for justice

More than 26 years ago, Indian soldiers allegedly raped more than 30 women in the Kashmiri villages of Kunan and Poshpora. Those who survived the attack are still fighting for justice, as Aliya Nazki from BBC Urdu reports.

It was 23 February 1991. The people of Kunan, a tiny village in Indian administered Kashmir’s Kupwara district, were retiring for the night after a cold winter day. Zooni and Zarina (not their real names) were also getting ready to go to bed when they heard a series of loud knocks on the door.

At the time, India had started a large scale military operation in an attempt to control a popular insurgency against Indian rule in Kashmir. So-called “cordon and search” operations, locally called “crackdowns”, were becoming routine and still persist to this day. In the 1990s, this would entail Indian security forces isolating an area, getting all the men out, and then searching the houses. The men would be paraded in front of an informer – and suspected militants or those deemed sympathisers would be picked up and taken away.

When Zooni and Zareena saw soldiers on their doorstep that night, remembering that day makes their eyes fill with tears even now. “We were getting ready for bed when the soldiers came. They took the men away. Some started drinking alcohol. I was holding my two-year-old daughter in my arms when they tried to grab me.
“I resisted, and in the scuffle she fell out of my arms, and out of the window. She was crippled for life.
“Three soldiers grabbed me, tore my pheran (shirt) – I don’t even know what all happened after that. There were five of them. I still remember their faces.”

Zareena was also in the same house. It had only been 11 days since her wedding. “I had returned from my parents’ house that very day. “Some soldiers asked my mother-in-law about all the new clothes hanging in the room, so she told them, ‘here, she is our new daughter-in-law, our new bride’. “What happened after that, I cannot begin to describe it. We haven’t just been wronged, what we have faced is an infinite injustice. Even today when we see soldiers we start shaking with fear.”

The people of Kunan and neighbouring Poshpora accuse the Indian army of carrying out a planned mass rape of the women in these two far-flung villages. They also claim that while the women were gang-raped, the men were subjected to horrific torture, and that they have been fighting for justice these last 26 years.

And now it seems a group of young Kashmiri women are determined to wipe this dust away.
In 2013 they filed a petition to reopen the case in the state High Court.
But not all. We spoke with Nayeema Ahmad Mahjoor, who heads the state commission for women’s rights.
She told us very clearly that she believes that this crime was committed against the people of Kunan and Poshpora, and that this should be proved in court.

Double Standard of Trump

Interior Minister Chaudhary Nisar Ali Khan on Tuesday said that Indian government was involved in severe human rights violations in occupied Kashmir.

The interior minister stated this while reacting to the statement issued after Indian prime minister’s meeting the US president in Washington, which gives the impression as if there was no importance of bloodletting of innocent Kashmiris by India.

Nisar said it is alarming that the US were articulating her views in India’s language.
India has been engaged in crushing the movement of self-determination since day one, he added.
The minister said that New Delhi has been making efforts to present the struggle for independence movement as terrorism.

He vowed that there would never be any compromise on rights of Kashmiris and Pakistan would continue to support their just cause till realization of right of self-determination in accordance with the UN resolutions.
He said the right of self-determination and freedom from Indian subjugation is destiny of Kashmiris and no power on earth can deprive them of their legitimate right.

India’s oppressive posture should have been a source of concern for a principled and conscientious nation.
The interior minister said the statement of the US administration gives an impression as if international laws on human rights are not applicable in the case of Kashmiris and serious crimes including blood bath of innocent people can be ignored.
A few samples of Atrocities committed by Indian Armed Forces on Civilians of Kashmir, Forcibly Occupied in 1947 by Indian Army violating UNO Charter and disregarding the Pact signed by India with UK and Pakistan.

U N O FIGURES OF JANUARY 1989 TO MARCH 2016

The News International

Solidarity with People of Jammu & Kashmir

All the people across the Pakistan and Azad Jammu & Kashmir mark the February 5, as solidarity day in a befitting manner to pay homage to martyrs of state Jammu & Kashmir, and express unity with people of Indian occupied part of the state in their rightful struggle for freedom from Indian subjugation.

Pakistan had been marking the day since 1990 to highlight the plight of people of the State Jammu & Kashmir for their birth-right to self-determination promised to them by the international community through UN Security Council Resolutions of January 17, 1948, April 21 1948, August 13, 1948 and January 05, 1949, and make it realize of its obligation of ensuring a UN sponsored plebiscite in the state according to the wishes of the people of the state.

Solidarity Day was first observed in 1990 when nation collectively prayed for the success of freedom movement of people of Kashmiri.

Symbolically, the Kashmir valley is known as “heaven on earth” which showcases stunning natural beauty, heavenly glimpses of different seasons and popular for its rare arts and crafts. While after the illegal occupation of a big part of Jammu & Kashmir state by Indian army, the heaven of Kashmir valley was enclosed in barbed wires drenched in blood and smell of Gun Powder which raised the issue of mass scale human rights violation committed by Indian Armed Forces in Jammu & Kashmir.

Kashmir problem is unfinished agenda of partition plan of 1947 which librated India from British Crown to make two free states Pakistan and India.

Under the plan the State of Jammu & Kashmir would have become part of Pakistan but unfortunately soon after independence India occupied the state and kept people of the territory under its yoke. However, people of State started freedom movement and liberated part of the State Jammu & Kashmir from Indian occupation which is known as Azad (free) Jammu & Kashmir.

The day protests against Indian occupation and atrocities on the inhabitants of the part of the State Jammu & Kashmir occupied by India using her military might. This issue is a real bone of contention in the relations of Pakistan and India since 1947.

Pity the so-called Flag-Bearers of Humanity, USA, Russia and UK who kill thousands of people in the name of human rights, but dam-care about their own promises given in UNO about seven decades back.

The Indian Express newspaper reported on Sunday that doctors at Srinagar’s Shri Maharaja Singh hospital have treated at least 446 patients with injuries sustained from being shot at with pellet guns, which have been used against protesters by Indian forces in the region.
A majority of victims have “multiple structural damage” to their eyes, the state government told the Jammu and Kashmir High Court, according to the daily.
Pellet guns have been widely used to quell protests in Kashmir that erupted after a popular rebel commander, Burhan Wani, was killed in a gun battle with Indian security forces last month.
At least 66 people have been killed in the almost daily anti-India protests and rolling curfews prompted by the killing of Wani on July 8.
The Central Reserve Police Force, an Indian paramilitary unit, told the Jammu and Kashmir High Court that it had used 1.3 million pellets in 32 days, adding that “it was difficult to follow the standard operating procedure given the nature of the protests”.

How U.S. Torture Left a Legacy of Damaged Minds

Beatings, sleep deprivation, menacing and other brutal tactics have led to persistent mental health problems among detainees held in secret C.I.A. prisons and at Guantánamo.
By MATT APUZZO, SHERI FINK and JAMES RISEN
October 8, 2016

Before the United States permitted a terrifying way of interrogating prisoners, government lawyers and intelligence officials assured themselves of one crucial outcome. They knew that the methods inflicted on terrorism suspects would be painful, shocking and far beyond what the country had ever accepted. But none of it, they concluded, would cause long lasting psychological harm.
Fifteen years later, it is clear they were wrong.

Today in Slovakia, Hussein al-Marfadi describes permanent headaches and disturbed sleep, plagued by memories of dogs inside a blackened jail. In Kazakhstan, Lutfi bin Ali is haunted by nightmares of suffocating at the bottom of a well. In Libya, the radio from a passing car spurs rage in Majid Mokhtar Sasy al-Maghrebi, reminding him of the C.I.A. prison where earsplitting music was just one assault to his senses.

And then there is the despair of men who say they are no longer themselves. “I am living this kind of depression,” said Younous Chekkouri, a Moroccan, who fears going outside because he sees faces in crowds as Guantánamo Bay guards. “I’m not normal anymore.”

After enduring agonizing treatment in secret C.I.A. prisons around the world or coercive practices at the military detention camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, dozens of detainees developed persistent mental health problems, according to previously undisclosed medical records, government documents and interviews with former prisoners and military and civilian doctors. Some emerged with the same symptoms as American prisoners of war who were brutalized decades earlier by some of the world’s cruelest regimes.

Those subjected to the tactics included victims of mistaken identity or flimsy evidence that the United States later disavowed. Others were foot soldiers for the Taliban or Al Qaeda who were later deemed to pose little threat. Some were hardened terrorists, including those accused of plotting the Sept. 11 attacks or the 2000 bombing of the American destroyer Cole. In several cases, their mental status has complicated the nation’s long effort to bring them to justice.

Americans have long debated the legacy of post-Sept. 11 interrogation methods, asking whether they amounted to torture or succeeded in extracting intelligence. But even as President Obama continues transferring people from Guantánamo and Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, promises to bring back techniques, now banned, such as waterboarding, the human toll has gone largely uncalculated.

At least half of the 39 people who went through the C.I.A.’s “enhanced interrogation” program, which included depriving them of sleep, dousing them with ice water, slamming them into walls and locking them in coffin-like boxes, have since shown psychiatric problems, The New York Times found. Some have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, paranoia, depression or psychosis.

Hundreds more detainees moved through C.I.A. “black sites” or Guantánamo, where the military inflicted sensory deprivation, isolation, menacing with dogs and other tactics on men who now show serious damage. Nearly all have been released.

“There is no question that these tactics were entirely inconsistent with our values as Americans, and their consequences present lasting challenges for us as a country and for the individuals involved,” said Ben Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser.

The United States government has never studied the long-term psychological effects of the extraordinary interrogation practices it embraced. A Defense Department spokeswoman, asked about long-term mental harm, responded that prisoners were treated humanely and had access to excellent care. A C.I.A. spokesman declined to comment.

This article is based on a broad sampling of cases and an examination of hundreds of documents, including court records, military commission transcripts and medical assessments. The Times interviewed more than 100 people, including former detainees in a dozen countries. A full accounting is all but impossible because many former prisoners never had access to outside doctors or lawyers, and any records about their interrogation treatment and health status remain classified.

Researchers caution that it can be difficult to determine cause and effect with mental illness. Some prisoners of the C.I.A. and the military had underlying psychological problems that may have made them more susceptible to long-term difficulties; others appeared to have been remarkably resilient. Incarceration, particularly the indefinite detention without charges that the United States devised, is inherently stressful. Still, outside medical consultants and former government officials said they saw a pattern connecting the harsh practices to psychiatric issues
Those treating prisoners at Guantánamo for mental health issues typically did not ask their patients what had happened during their questioning. Some physicians, though, saw evidence of mental harm almost immediately.
“My staff was dealing with the consequences of the interrogations without knowing what was going on,” said Albert J. Shimkus, a retired Navy captain who served as the commanding officer of the Guantánamo hospital in the prison’s early years. Back then, still reeling from the Sept. 11 attacks, the government was desperate to stave off more.

But Captain Shimkus now regrets not making more inquiries. “There was a conflict,” he said, “between our medical duty to our patients and our duty to the mission, as soldiers.”

After prisoners were released from American custody, some found neither help nor relief. Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad, a businessman in Tanzania, and others were snatched, interrogated and imprisoned, then sent home without explanation. They returned to their families deeply scarred from interrogations, isolation and the shame of sexual taunts, forced nudity, aggressive body cavity searches and being kept in diapers.

Mr. Asad, who died in May, was held for more than a year in several secret C.I.A. prisons. “Sometimes, between husband and wife, he would admit to how awful he felt,” his widow, Zahra Mohamed, wrote in a statement prepared for the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights. “He was humiliated, and that feeling never went away.”

Courtesy: New York Times