Double Standard of Trump

Interior Minister Chaudhary Nisar Ali Khan on Tuesday said that Indian government was involved in severe human rights violations in occupied Kashmir.

The interior minister stated this while reacting to the statement issued after Indian prime minister’s meeting the US president in Washington, which gives the impression as if there was no importance of bloodletting of innocent Kashmiris by India.

Nisar said it is alarming that the US were articulating her views in India’s language.
India has been engaged in crushing the movement of self-determination since day one, he added.
The minister said that New Delhi has been making efforts to present the struggle for independence movement as terrorism.

He vowed that there would never be any compromise on rights of Kashmiris and Pakistan would continue to support their just cause till realization of right of self-determination in accordance with the UN resolutions.
He said the right of self-determination and freedom from Indian subjugation is destiny of Kashmiris and no power on earth can deprive them of their legitimate right.

India’s oppressive posture should have been a source of concern for a principled and conscientious nation.
The interior minister said the statement of the US administration gives an impression as if international laws on human rights are not applicable in the case of Kashmiris and serious crimes including blood bath of innocent people can be ignored.
A few samples of Atrocities committed by Indian Armed Forces on Civilians of Kashmir, Forcibly Occupied in 1947 by Indian Army violating UNO Charter and disregarding the Pact signed by India with UK and Pakistan.

U N O FIGURES OF JANUARY 1989 TO MARCH 2016

The News International

Humanity and The West

Helen Joanne Cox was a British Labour Party politician who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for the Batley and Spen constituency from her election in May 2015.

At 12:53 pm BST on 16 June 2016, Cox was fatally shot and stabbed outside a library in Birstall, West Yorkshire, where she was about to hold a constituency surgery at 1:00 pm. A 77-year-old local man, Bernard Kenny, was also stabbed in the stomach while trying to fend off her attacker.

Thomas Mair, a 52-year-old Batley and Spen constituent had links to the U.S.-based neo-Nazi group National Alliance, shouted “This is for Britain. Britain will always come first” as he carried out the attack.

Cox was born Helen Joanne Leadbeater on 22 June 1974 in Batley, West Yorkshire, England. She was educated at Heckmondwike Grammar School, where she was head girl. During summers, she worked packing toothpaste. Cox studied Social and Political Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in 1995. She later studied at the London School of Economics.

Following her graduation, Cox worked as an adviser to Labour MP Joan Walley. From 2001 to 2009, she worked for the aid groups Oxfam and head of Oxfam International’s humanitarian campaigns in New York City in 2007. Her work for Oxfam in which she met disadvantaged groups in Darfur and Afghanistan influenced her political thinking. Cox’s charity work led to a role advising Sarah Brown, wife of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who was spearheading a campaign to prevent deaths in pregnancy and childbirth. Cox was the national chair of the Labour Women’s Network and a senior adviser to the Freedom Fund, an anti-slavery charity.

Reasons for Cox’s Murder

Cox, a supporter of the Labour Friends of Palestine & the Middle East, called for the lifting of the blockade of the Gaza Strip.

Cox campaigned for a solution to the Syrian Civil War. In October 2015, she co-authored an article in The Observer with Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell, arguing that British military forces could help achieve an ethical solution to the conflict, including the creation of civilian safe havens in Syria. During that month Cox launched the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group, becoming its chair. In the Commons vote in December to approve UK military intervention against ISIL in Syria, Cox abstained because she believed in a more comprehensive strategy that would also include combatting President Bashar al-Assad and his “indiscriminate barrel bombs”.
She wrote:
By refusing to tackle Assad’s brutality, we may actively alienate more of the Sunni population, driving them towards Isis. So I have decided to abstain. Because I am not against airstrikes per se, but I cannot actively support them unless they are part of a plan. Because I believe in action to address Isis, but do not believe it will work in isolation.

Army major who ‘tied’ Kashmiri man to jeep honoured

The incident had deepened the army-civilian divide and sparked violent protests in the militancy-hit valley. Reports Rahul Singh of Hindustan Times, New Delhi (India). May 22, 2017 Indian Standard Time

An army major, who was in the eye of a storm for allegedly tying a Kashmiri man to a jeep to use him as a human shield, has been awarded the army chief’s commendation card. Confirming the development, army spokesperson Colonel Aman Anand said the officer had been awarded the Chief of Army Staff’s Commendation (COAS) card for “sustained efforts in CI (counter insurgency) operations”.

The army found itself in the middle of a firestorm after the surfacing of a video clip that showed a man tied to the fender of a Rakshak jeep and paraded through villages. A day after the video clip surfaced on April 14, 2017 the army ordered a probe into the incident.

In the video, announcements of people being warned that “this will be the fate of stone-pelters” could be heard in the background. The incident had triggered outrage in Kashmir, with separatists saying it was on “expected lines from an oppressor”.

The incident had deepened the army-civilian divide and sparked violent protests in the militancy-hit valley.

How U.S. Torture Left a Legacy of Damaged Minds

Beatings, sleep deprivation, menacing and other brutal tactics have led to persistent mental health problems among detainees held in secret C.I.A. prisons and at Guantánamo.
By MATT APUZZO, SHERI FINK and JAMES RISEN
October 8, 2016

Before the United States permitted a terrifying way of interrogating prisoners, government lawyers and intelligence officials assured themselves of one crucial outcome. They knew that the methods inflicted on terrorism suspects would be painful, shocking and far beyond what the country had ever accepted. But none of it, they concluded, would cause long lasting psychological harm.
Fifteen years later, it is clear they were wrong.

Today in Slovakia, Hussein al-Marfadi describes permanent headaches and disturbed sleep, plagued by memories of dogs inside a blackened jail. In Kazakhstan, Lutfi bin Ali is haunted by nightmares of suffocating at the bottom of a well. In Libya, the radio from a passing car spurs rage in Majid Mokhtar Sasy al-Maghrebi, reminding him of the C.I.A. prison where earsplitting music was just one assault to his senses.

And then there is the despair of men who say they are no longer themselves. “I am living this kind of depression,” said Younous Chekkouri, a Moroccan, who fears going outside because he sees faces in crowds as Guantánamo Bay guards. “I’m not normal anymore.”

After enduring agonizing treatment in secret C.I.A. prisons around the world or coercive practices at the military detention camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, dozens of detainees developed persistent mental health problems, according to previously undisclosed medical records, government documents and interviews with former prisoners and military and civilian doctors. Some emerged with the same symptoms as American prisoners of war who were brutalized decades earlier by some of the world’s cruelest regimes.

Those subjected to the tactics included victims of mistaken identity or flimsy evidence that the United States later disavowed. Others were foot soldiers for the Taliban or Al Qaeda who were later deemed to pose little threat. Some were hardened terrorists, including those accused of plotting the Sept. 11 attacks or the 2000 bombing of the American destroyer Cole. In several cases, their mental status has complicated the nation’s long effort to bring them to justice.

Americans have long debated the legacy of post-Sept. 11 interrogation methods, asking whether they amounted to torture or succeeded in extracting intelligence. But even as President Obama continues transferring people from Guantánamo and Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, promises to bring back techniques, now banned, such as waterboarding, the human toll has gone largely uncalculated.

At least half of the 39 people who went through the C.I.A.’s “enhanced interrogation” program, which included depriving them of sleep, dousing them with ice water, slamming them into walls and locking them in coffin-like boxes, have since shown psychiatric problems, The New York Times found. Some have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, paranoia, depression or psychosis.

Hundreds more detainees moved through C.I.A. “black sites” or Guantánamo, where the military inflicted sensory deprivation, isolation, menacing with dogs and other tactics on men who now show serious damage. Nearly all have been released.

“There is no question that these tactics were entirely inconsistent with our values as Americans, and their consequences present lasting challenges for us as a country and for the individuals involved,” said Ben Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser.

The United States government has never studied the long-term psychological effects of the extraordinary interrogation practices it embraced. A Defense Department spokeswoman, asked about long-term mental harm, responded that prisoners were treated humanely and had access to excellent care. A C.I.A. spokesman declined to comment.

This article is based on a broad sampling of cases and an examination of hundreds of documents, including court records, military commission transcripts and medical assessments. The Times interviewed more than 100 people, including former detainees in a dozen countries. A full accounting is all but impossible because many former prisoners never had access to outside doctors or lawyers, and any records about their interrogation treatment and health status remain classified.

Researchers caution that it can be difficult to determine cause and effect with mental illness. Some prisoners of the C.I.A. and the military had underlying psychological problems that may have made them more susceptible to long-term difficulties; others appeared to have been remarkably resilient. Incarceration, particularly the indefinite detention without charges that the United States devised, is inherently stressful. Still, outside medical consultants and former government officials said they saw a pattern connecting the harsh practices to psychiatric issues
Those treating prisoners at Guantánamo for mental health issues typically did not ask their patients what had happened during their questioning. Some physicians, though, saw evidence of mental harm almost immediately.
“My staff was dealing with the consequences of the interrogations without knowing what was going on,” said Albert J. Shimkus, a retired Navy captain who served as the commanding officer of the Guantánamo hospital in the prison’s early years. Back then, still reeling from the Sept. 11 attacks, the government was desperate to stave off more.

But Captain Shimkus now regrets not making more inquiries. “There was a conflict,” he said, “between our medical duty to our patients and our duty to the mission, as soldiers.”

After prisoners were released from American custody, some found neither help nor relief. Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad, a businessman in Tanzania, and others were snatched, interrogated and imprisoned, then sent home without explanation. They returned to their families deeply scarred from interrogations, isolation and the shame of sexual taunts, forced nudity, aggressive body cavity searches and being kept in diapers.

Mr. Asad, who died in May, was held for more than a year in several secret C.I.A. prisons. “Sometimes, between husband and wife, he would admit to how awful he felt,” his widow, Zahra Mohamed, wrote in a statement prepared for the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights. “He was humiliated, and that feeling never went away.”

Courtesy: New York Times

How Mountbatten favoured Nehru

Lord Mountbatten was the last Viceroy of India appointed by the Britishr rulers. Jawahar Lal Nehru became close friend of Lady Edwina Mountbatten. Due to their friendship and also because the British didn’t like Muslims, Hindus were favoured out of the way at the time of partition of India in 1947. (A glimpse of the nature of Edwina-Nehru friendship can be had by clicking here)

An Extract from Historical Facts recorded by an Indian Hindu, Jawahar Lal
The Punjab had 7 cities with populations over 100,000. Lahore 630,000, Amritsar 390,000. Rawalpindi, Multan, Sialkot, Ludhiana, and Jalandhar had populations between 100,000 and 200,000. Except Jalandhar, all had clear Muslim majorities. Jalandhar had Muslim majorities however, if non-Muslims of all types were grouped together, they became majority.
The overall religious distribution in Punjab, including the princely states, was 53% Muslim, 30% Hindu, 14.6% Sikh, 1.4% Christian, and 1% Other.
The Punjab can be divided into five areas. punjab-religions-19411
(1) The west (Green & Dark Green), which was generally 80% or even 90% Muslim.
(2) The center-west (Blackish Green), which was majority Muslim, but typically around 60% with large Sikh minorities.
(3) The center-east (Blue & Dark Brown), with no obvious majority religion. This is where much of the worst carnage during Partition took place.
(4) The southeast, (brown & reddish Brown) the area south of the Area (3), in what is now Haryana. This part of the Punjab had a Hindu majority, but it was relatively narrow, and the communal split was Hindu/Muslim, with few Sikhs in the mix. In this map, Delhi is included as zone four, because communally and culturally, it was similar to the nearby parts of the Punjab. (5) Bright red & Brownish Red, the area North of Area (3) which now is called Himachal Pradesh. It was almost exclusively Hindu.

Boundry Commission nominated by the British Ruler announced it’s decision, known as Redcliff Award on August 17, 1947, that is, 3 days after the day when Independent Pakistan and India came in to being. In complete disregard of the agreed principles, Redcliff gave large Muslim majority area to India while it was the righ of Pakistan. See the map. greater-punjab-religions-today
(1) West Punjab given to Pakistan (Green)
(2) East Punjab given to India (All areas other than Green)
The author writes, “To my eyes, this looks like an extremely favorable result for India. No Hindu/Sikh majority district went to Pakistan, while several swaths of Muslim majority territory ended up in Indian hands.”